The annual salary review, while written into many employees’ contracts, seems to be a fast dying event.

Many employees (especially those of larger organisations) who have been accustomed to receiving an increase in wage have witnessed the tide turning. Once automatic, salary increases have been held back by many employers in recent years. Many companies sight the static economy or budgetary restraints as key reasons. While both arguments are sound, if you have and are expecting an increase and it’s been some time since your last pay rise, resentment can set in.

Your mind shifts and instead of accessing promotional opportunities and future pay rises you unwittingly commence your own demise.

Let’s play this out…

When you don’t get presented with a rise you will start to sabotage your work either knowingly or unknowingly.
Previously committed and punctual you now come to work that little bit later, extend lunch and coffee breaks, let “social” distractions fill more of your day, take longer to get started and complete tasks, you start to bicker about colleagues, your boss or the company and, when its finish time you’re out the door in a flash. As for your sick days they are continually maxed out.

And…in your mind you are fully justified! images-5

“If my company doesn’t think I’m worth a pay rise then I’ll just do the absolute necessity of my job. I
don’t owe the company anymore than that.” This is not uncommon and I’ve witnessed it in mine and my client’s companies many times over.  The conversation that should have been had was never entered into and automatic scripting prevails.

So…what happens next?

Instead of going up the chain, as the once golden employee, you become a fly in the ointment. Your change of demeanour has now been flagged on your manager’s radar. Don’t be surprised that acknowledgements and recognition for a job well done are replaced with scrutiny on performance, punctuality and attitude.

“But I’ve always done my job” you continue to justify. However you fail to realise the affect your waning attitude has had on your functionality within your job, the team and the company overall. Once given responsibility and autonomy you are required to frequently report in or your manager is constantly over your shoulder with that dreaded management style “micro-management” – Arghh!!

“How did it get to this?” You ask.

You moved from being dedicated to slightly ambivalent and now you downright hate everything about your job.

The key, and the heart of it is to have an open discussion about why a pay rise doesn’t happen..early!!

If it’s an impossibility and a blanket policy across the company it’s then and there you either accept it and continue as you were; equally dedicated and committed or take action to look for another opportunity where you will receive what you believe you’re worth elsewhere.

If bonuses and pay rises are available have a frank talk with your manager. Ask how you stack up and what they are seeking that will assure you receive an increment. If you can, do this before the review (in your informal meetings) and start showing evidence of the results, achievements or targets they seek. Then, if rises and bonuses are on offer, you are now in good stead. You have a strong probability of receiving a rise (hoorah!) while earning your place as a key contributor as well as the other career benefits this brings.

Whatever you do…don’t sit and stew…take action and be committed, whatever action you take.

Article written by Director Maree Herath.

 

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